Pulp Idol Firsts!

December 2013 will not only bring the usual merriment of Christmas and festive cheer, but also the publication launch of Pulp Idol Firsts 2013. This is a book filled with wonderful first chapters from up and coming writers, including myself, Clare Doran, and Sarah Tarbit. This will be an exciting event for not only those published within the book but also those who have made it possible. So, thank you to Writing On The Wall and the editors for great feedback. I would highly recommend next year’s competition to fellow writers, even to give yourself the confidence and belief you might need to progress with your writing.

There will be live music and cracking conversation at the launch as well as a chance to have a looksie at the end result.

12th December, Siren Cafe, 54 St James Street, Liverpool @ 7pm.

N.

Young At Heart.

 What’s your favourite childhood book?

Hiding amongst the array of books under the Influences tab you will see one called Hiding Out. Small blonde boy? Sitting by a camp fire? Wearing an orange jumper? Found it? Excellent!

If you said to me, name a memorable book from my childhood, this would be number one. It’s every child’s fear to be forgotten when the whole family leaves you behind on a trip… Home Alone style. But this book turns the situation into an adventure. I related to this story mostly because the family in question is travelling through France to get to their holiday destination. Now, I’ve spent many a time squashed in the middle seat of our old Peugeot 405 whilst trekking to our campsite in the south of France (made especially more comfortable when Dad shoves a load of duty free wine in between your seats!) so totally understand the need to pull over, stretch those legs, have a jambon baguette, and a quick explore. Thankfully, Mum and Dad never left me behind…or the duty free wine, so reading this book as a youngster was a chance to find out what could happen in that situation.

Peter (the boy on the front cover) is accidentally left behind in a rural French provence. He learns to build a fire, keep warm, and survive with what little he can find in the French countryside. I won’t go into the whole story, but what starts out as a terrifying situation for Peter becomes an important quest for survival. He comes across animals he’s never seen before, French farmers he cannot understand, and foods he’s never tasted or even heard of.

Rightly so, Hiding Out has won a few awards back in the mid-nineties and the tale has stayed prominent in my mind till this very day. I learned how adventures can lead to independence, how negatives can turn into positives, how important family is, and how other cultures and countries differ from our own. It sparked my imagination. I still love and reference this book and will continue to do so in years to come, particularly to the younger generation of my family.  It was also the first time I had read French in fiction. I ended up studying French and English at university…. Maybe Elizabeth Laird and Hiding Out inspired me more than I could ever imagine!

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 Go on…dig out your favourite childhood book!

N.

Reading Aloud, Reading Together.

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I mentioned in previous posts that I was soon to become a reading volunteer for The Reader Organisation’s Get Into Reading program. I have been with a group for the past seven weeks now and it has so far been one of the most rewarding things I have ever done. My expectations have been succeeded. I read to a group of approximately five people every Thursday morning in a local residential care home. That one hour of my day is by far the most enjoyable. I take along a selection of poems boasting plenty of discussion, sometimes they like a poem, sometimes they don’t…and that’s ok. As long as the session of reading aloud and reading together stimulates them, I am happy. The Reader Organisation has carried out lengthy research to show just how beneficial this process is and I am glad to now be a part of it. 

Reading aloud is harder than most people think. It takes confidence and courage, not just for me, but for the group members. The best bit is when they begin to read the poem aloud off their own bat, no prompt, just sheer enjoyment of poetry. That is what we do, we read aloud and we read together. Get Into Reading is such a fantastic program so if you find yourself with a fair amount of free time and think you’d be a good volunteer, keep an eye on the website (click the image above). In fact, look at their website anyway, it’s brill, and they do a brill job. 

N.

Idol Final!

This was a brilliant day all round, not only did I get to read my first chapter out in front of enthusiastic listeners, encouraging judges, and inspiring writers, I also got to see the new Central Library in Liverpool (you should go, it’s beautiful). All ten writers had such amazing novel ideas and it’s very exciting as we will all be published in Writing on the Wall’s Firsts book, due out later in the year. The competition has given me the confidence I needed to believe in my novel and proceed full steam ahead! 

Now…where’s my pen?!

N.

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WoW! A Finalist.

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Last month I entered a competition for first chapters in the Liverpool based literary festival, Writing on The Wall. I gave it a go for the experience of reading my own work aloud, which as I experienced is much more nerve-wracking than reading someone else’s. You also get to read in front of a panel of established writers who ask you questions regarding your novel. This was particularly useful for me as it got me thinking even further about where my novel could potentially go and where it would fit. It was a brilliant evening and I felt encouraged by the judges’ comments. Cormorano has some weight behind it and I am now more excited for its possibilities. I even found myself going through to the final, which will be held on the 25th May. An all round great experience.

N.

Paris…In My Heart

A few days spent in Paris just strengthens the admiration I have for the place. It’s beautiful and full of life. Below are a few photos… I even found a Cormorant… they get everywhere! 

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Take me back!

N.

New Publication

Along with a few of my fellow MA colleagues, a couple of my poems have been included in the first issue of Subtext Anthology. This is edited by fellow John Moores students and contains some brilliant prose, poetry, and articles from new and promising writers. 

It is available to download on Amazon Kindle, either on the device or via the Kindle app. If you can spare 77p please support budding editors and some of my fabulous fellow writers. Click the link below.

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Happy Reading.

N.

Please read this, tres interessant.

N.

The Reader Online

 The Reader Organisation is calling for a new language to talk about mental health, with senior health professionals, readers and writers discussing the idea in the opening session of our annual conference, ‘Shared Reading for Healthy Communities’ at the British Library on 16th May 2013.

Our Get Into Reading project is commissioned by health services across the UK,  but unlike the growing number of ‘Books on Prescription’ and ‘Bibliotheraphy’ schemes, we have chosen not to limit the description of our model as ‘therapy’. We believe literature exists to address the human condition, as our founder and director Jane Davis explains:

“Those medical words – prescription, therapy – which at first glance carry a medical imprimatur of seriousness, have largely come from the pharmaceutical and psychotherapeutic industries, and actually point to a re-positioning of the inner life as a problem to be solved by experts, by others.

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Allowed to be Aloud

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Reading, as we all know, is usually a silent and personal activity, and the only time we read aloud is say for a presentation or reading to children, or to a group. So why don’t we ever read aloud to ourselves whilst curled up alone with a book? I mean, say you’re on the train or bus and start belting out chapter 2 of your current selection then granted, people may look at you strangely. wouldn’t, but others unfortunately would. I have tried it a few times when I’ve been reading alone and I find it really does help me connect with the words and the story. Not only does it help me but I feel like I owe it to the author; this is their passion here in front of me and in some cases, their life’s work so the more attention I give to it, the more alive it becomes. 

As well as reading the work of other writers, reading aloud my own writing is helpful as I can hear the places where improvement is needed e.g. tone, emphasis, structure etc. If I stumble over something I have written, then my reader is more than likely to do so also. 

I am soon to become a reading volunteer for a reading organisation that includes reading aloud to groups of people of an older age. I am looking forward to this and will be sure to post all the details as this develops. 

So, for now, allow yourself to read aloud.

N.

Lovely.

The Reader Online

Following a successful year-long pilot, a county-wide network of Get Into Reading groups is currently being rolled out across Devon libraries as part of a pioneering scheme to improve memory and mental wellbeing through shared reading.

Devon County Council were so impressed by the pilot groups in Tiverton and Exeter Central, that they have invested a further £100,000 for us to  run five ‘Library Memory Groups‘ for those with memory loss conditions and their carers, as well as seven ‘Feel Better with a Book Groups’ for those wanting to lift their mood and engage with others for enjoyment and general support.

Cllr Andrea Davis, Devon County Council’s Cabinet Member for Health and Wellbeing said:

“The power of a good book is outstanding. Sharing reading as part of a groups is a really enjoyable experience, and can also help improve wellbeing, boost confidence, self-esteem and combat isolation. These…

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